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Category: TOP GUNS

​Here's another nice video sent by the Hungarian Air Force from the time they trained in Visdel with their MS20 upgraded Gripens.


​Here are some photos and an action-packed b-roll video from the first test flight of the second Gripen E test aircraft. Test pilot Robin's smile and thumbs-up says it all!

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Gripen E development sees Saab, FMV and the Swedish Air Force working together at each stage of development, jointly validating and verifying aircraft systems. As a part of this, test pilot from FMV, Major Henrik Wänseth, flew Gripen E (39-8) for the first time last week. 

“Flying Gripen E was a major target for both FMV and myself. It was both fun and good to verify that what we saw in rigs and simulators matched the aircraft in reality," says Henrik Wänseth, who has been located at Saab for the last two years.

"It will be very exciting to see the tactical systems integrated with this prototype. It will be interesting to see how it grows into a complete combat aircraft system," he adds.

As a part of this testing, functions of the engine, APU, radar, and the Gripen’s overall flight performance were evaluated.

This is the first time when three parties are performing validation and verification together to increase the efficiency of Gripen development. As per Saab, validation confirms whether the correct product has been built. It shows whether the aircraft is operationally viable and capable of the intended functions. Verification confirms whether the product is correctly built – whether the requirements have been met.

"We have several systems that are being integrated and tested at the moment. These include the tactical systems and the new cockpit,” says Karin Brinkebäck project leader, Gripen E Systems Development at Saab.

How does a first flight on a new aircraft feel like? Straight from the pilot’s mouth. Test pilot Robin tells about the first flight with the second Gripen E test aircraft.

Akaer’s partnership with Saab began long before the Gripen Brazil contract was signed. Back in 2009, Akaer was already a part of the Gripen design team, and was involved in small work packages with Gripen. It all started with developing the real fuselage structure (designing the structural parts and conducting the stress analysis of these parts), and engineering. Then they started working on the gun section and electrical projects. Today, Akaer is working in the development of the two-seater aircraft.

One of the first Brazilian companies to have partnered with Saab, Akaer boasts of a portfolio of more than half a million hours of work dedicated to the Gripen programme since 2009.

“They have done the development of structural details, the rear fuselage for both the Swedish and now the Brazilian version (Gripen E). We have a long-lasting relationship with Akaer,” says Mikael Franzen, Head of Business Unit Gripen Brazil-Saab. 

“And now they are involved in the development of the two-seater aircraft as well. We are giving more and more work to Akaer,” he adds.

While Brazil benefits from this wide-ranging technological transfer programme, this relationship between Akaer and Saab is equally valuable for Saab which is constantly looking for new partners to develop new products and services. Saab hopes that Akaer will be able to participate in other projects in Brazil and abroad in future. One of the major reasons of the success of technology transfer programme in Brazil is partnerships like Saab ...

It is critical that the person in the cockpit has full confidence in the capabilities of the aircraft. So the opinion of the FAB pilots about Gripen is extremely relevant! 

​Gripen test pilots say they have the best job in the world. Watch the video to know why. 


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Flying during an airshow is a process planned well in advance. From the aerial maneuvers to flight formations to releasing flares and performing duals, every move during a display is tested, verified, approved, rehearsed for months and perfected.

In an interview with Lidovky.cz, Czech Gripen display pilot Ivo Kardoš, winner of the best display award this year at the NATO Days in Ostrava and Air Force Days, talks about his job, and nuances of air displays.

Display flying is not for the faint-hearted. It’s a challenging task that requires a lot of expertise. “An aerial display lasts for only ten minutes. But is exhausting. By the end of it, you can see me sweating like I have run for miles,” he says

"You have to love your job, or else you cannot do it."

About a standard day at work as a Gripen pilot, Kardoš says it begins with a briefing on the weather and availability of aircraft. Thereafter, pilots get the schedule of their tasks of the day. "We record our flights and analyze it later to see if there is any room for improvement."

Kardoš, who flies at about 15 airshows in a year, says the pilot has to concentrate a lot during a display flight as one has to fly very close to the ground. "We fly at a height of 100-200 yards. There is no time for mistakes. You have to display the same maneuvers you have learnt all ...

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Gripen Pilot Stanislav Čejka is no stranger to breakneck speeds, the smell of gasoline, and executing gravity defying stunts mid-air. In an interview with a Czech daily, Čejka talks about his journey as a pilot, and his office i.e. Gripen cockpit. 

Čejka was interested in flying ever since he was 3, and this can be attributed to the fact that the local barracks were a short distance from his home in Dvůr. He always enjoyed gazing into the sky to look at planes, and by the time he was 16, he was paying regular visits to the local aero-club to fly glider planes. 

Cejka's main job is that of a Gripen pilot. On days when he isn’t busy flying Gripen, he leads his Flying Bulls Aerobatics team.

While he has flown several types of aircrafts over the course of his illustrious career, he maintains that his favorite aircraft is the Gripen C/D, which he considers to be his office. His career-cum-hobby as a pilot, he notes, takes him to some of the most beautiful scenic locations known to humankind, which he enjoys from the best seat in the house – a Gripen cockpit. 

But how is flying a fighter like Gripen and an aerobatics plane related? Well, according to Čejka, the two go hand in hand – the more one gets acquainted to flying fighter planes, the better one gets with maneuvering. 

"The two types of flying complement each other. The more you fly a ...

At the end of the day, the person at the controls makes all the difference. Brazilian pilots will go through classes, presentations and protocols to prepare for flight tests of the Brazilian fighter that will take place at the Embraer headquarters in Gavião Peixoto, São Paulo.

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