Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content

Gripen

The Smart Fighter

Quick Launch

Gripen > Categories

Category: GRIPEN AIR FORCES

Flares may be released for defensive purposes, but one sure can’t deny how beautiful they look. Here is South African Air Forces' (SAAF) Gripen D releasing its flares across an illuminated night cityscape over a beach in Cape Town.

0278.jpg

​The Airbase Blog takes a close look at how munitions are loaded on a Gripen fighter at MH 59, Szentgyörgyi Dezső Airbase, Kecskemét.

Right from day one, the Hungarian Gripen fighters had the capability to use NATO interoperable weapons including Laser Guided Bombs (LGBs) like GBU-12, and non-directional Mk 82 bombs.  

A lot of theoretical and practical training goes into how these bombs are supposed to be handled. First of all, based on the training needs of the pilot, it is decided which weapon will be integrated to Gripen. While moving a bomb, all the necessary documents are checked first. All important data is mentioned on a felt attached to the bomb. 

Thereafter, based on the training requirement at the Air Base, the bomb is assembled and prepared for integration.

Four trained personnel carry out the bomb suspension process in Hungary. One of these personnel is responsible for keeping a close watch on all the steps involved. He or she also makes sure no one is aboard the fighter during the suspension process, and that there is no one smoking in the area either. 

Before the bomb is brought near the plane, the right kind of suspension rack (normal or emergency) is placed in the pylon. Then, an adapter, customized for lifting different kinds of weapons, is also brought in. 

The bombs, in the meantime, are placed horizontally on a frame, all strapped and ready to be integrated to Gripen. Once brought ...

The start-up of production at Saab Aeronáutica Montagens (SAM) plant is fast approaching. In just over a year's time, production will be up and running, where some 60 people, including operators, management, warehouse personnel, and engineers will be manufacturing parts for the Brazilian Gripen E/F fighters. And now, thanks to 3D scanning and CATIA models, it is now possible to tour the plant located outside Sao Paulo by using VR goggles.

Ola Rosén, Assembly Engineer, Saab, and the project manager at SAM, says. ”The aim was to give people an idea of how much space we have allocated for the current work packages. Does the layout allow our operators to move appropriately? Can they move around trollies? We are doing this to ensure that we don’t build the plant and then realise later that it is unsuitable. It will be used as a basis for decision-making before the layout is finalised.” 

Read the full story here.

gripen-calendar-2019-aw5_mars.jpg
Did you know?

South Africa has the second-largest fleet of Gripens, with 26 fighters.

Photo: Justin de Reuck

Download the calendar here​.

MoU2.jpg
Saab has taken another important step forward to expand its footprint and aerospace ecosystem in India by signing new Memorandums of Understanding (MoUs) with three of the country’s leading aerospace manufacturers; Dynamatic Technologies Limited, CIM Tools Private Limited and Sansera Engineering Limited.

The MoU with Dynamatic is a starting point to explore future joint opportunities in commercial and defence-related aerostructures work, including Gripen.

“The MoU with Dynamatic adds the capabilities of complex airframe assembly to Saab’s ‘Make in India’ offer for Gripen,”says Mats Palmberg, VP Industrial Partnerships and Head of Gripen for India. 

“Saab’s Aerostructures business unit has had a successful relationship with CIM Tools and Sansera for several years. Based on that experience, we see these two companies can add great value to our Gripen ‘Make in India’ offer,” Mats adds.

The new MoUs announced will enable Saab to work with these Indian companies to establish an indigenous, efficient, tailor-made manufacturing system that will develop, deliver, and support state-of-the-art Gripen fighters in India for the Indian Air Force.

Read the full story here​.

The goal of a night flying exercise is to develop combat readiness 24*7. The pilots get to train using the night time vision goggles and be better prepared for international missions.​ And of course night time training exercises make for a great video.


“Gripen is very easy to fly. And that helps the pilot to focus on the mission,” says Swedish Air Force Fighter pilot Henrik Björling, aka "Sunshine" about flying the fighter, at the Finnish Air Force' 100th anniversary celebration.

Much has been said about Gripen’s efficient maneuverability which is, among many, one of the most important reasons why it is considered to be a pilot’s fighter. But what is seldom discussed is the Human Machine Interface (HMI)

Gripen C/D’s cockpit is equipped with three large, full colour, Multi-Function Displays (MFDs) and a wide angle diffractive optics Head-Up Display (HUD) with a holographic combiner providing the pilot with a superior and outstanding situattional awareness.

As said during the training conducted by FAB (Brazilian Air Force) last year by Colonel Ricardo Rezende, the future Gripen pilots were able to effortlessly put theory into practice on the Gripen simulators. During the course of only one week, they had the opportunity to train different complex scenarios in simulators and learn basic combat technics, tactical datalinks, and situational awareness. “It is the outstanding Human Machine Interface (HMI) that makes Gripen easy for the pilot to use and maneuver,” said Colonel Ricardo Rezende.

RTAf gripen1_120219.jpg
rtafgripen2_120219.jpg
rtafgripen3_120219.jpg

Royal Thai Air Force welcomed students, parents and teachers to Wing 7 last week to familiarise them with operations at the Air Base.

Image Courtesy: RTAF

rtaf gripen 10_Katsuhiko Tokunaga.jpg
The last ten years of Gripen operations in Thailand have set new standards in South East Asia, says a report in Combataircraft.keypublishing.com.

According to the report, when the Royal Thai Air Force (RTAF) was looking for a new fighter to replace its ageing F-5E Tiger IIs, it was thinking outside the box. Unlike its previous military hardware choices, the air force was looking for a complete package with advanced sensors and network centric capabilities. The contract with Saab was signed in 2008. Deliveries began around 2011 for two single seaters (Gripen C) and four two seaters (Gripen D). They further ordered 6 more around 2010, which were delivered in two phases in 2013.

In the last ten years, Gripen has been a part of various RTAF missions and deployments. Last year, the RTAf Gripen completed 10,000 flight hours at the Pitch Black Exercise.

As per a Jane's report, RTAF is now looking to upgrade its Gripen fighters to MS20 configuration. "We are planning to upgrade the Gripens to the MS20 standard. We have seen the capabilities of the current standard and it would do everything we need," Group Captain Prachya Tippayarat, deputy commander of the RTAF's Wing 7 at Surat Thani Air Base, said.

Read the full story here.

The AESA radar is a huge advancement from earlier mechanical radars which were more prone to “jamming” and other mechanical errors and failures. Emphasizing on the difference in the principle of operation between the two radars, Air Vice Marshal Manmohan Bahadur (Retd.), Additional Director General, Centre for Air Power Studies, says in an interview that one of the biggest advantages of the AESA radar is that it uses an array of TRMs (Transmitter-Receiver Modules) allowing more range and adding more speed.

AESA stands for Active Electronically Scanned Array and means that, in contrast to older generation radars, it has not only one antenna but a full array of small antennas, called elements. This means that the radar can simultaneously and independently track different targets, and also track targets independently of search volumes.

Development of today’s Electronic Warfare (EW), radar, and communications functionality are done keeping air-superiority in mind. What makes Gripen E an air-to-air superior fighter is the integration of the latest generation precision weapons, targeting sensors, and an AESA radar that ensures superiority in situational awareness as well. The AESA radar was integrated to Gripen for the first time during a flight test program in 2009 which was focused on the tactical systems of the multi-role aircraft.

With AESA, Gripen E also features a repositioner which allows the AESA radar to gain another 40 degrees of scanning ability to either side of the aircraft’s nose.

In the words of Major General Ravi ...

1 - 10 >