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When Captain Gustavo de Oliveira Pascotto flew Gripen for the first time in 2015, he was very impressed with the way Gripen managed the pilot work load. "What I liked the most was the highly advanced human-machine interface," he said.

Pascotto was one of the first few Brazilian pilots who left Anápolis for F7 in Såtenäs to learn all about the future fighter of their Air Force and pass on this knowledge to his colleagues and newly qualified Gripen instructors.

Fast forward to today, and more than 140 professionals have been trained in Sweden till date. They have already returned to Brazil, and most of them are working at the Gripen Design and Development Network (GDDN).

Today, there is an excitement amongst everyone at the Brazilian Air Force about the arrival of new fighters with people eagerly waiting for Gripen to become operational in Brazil.

“There is a desire and a thrill that has not been seen for a long time. Today we have a group dedicated to studying this aircraft, which asks us a lot of questions. The pilots know they will have the opportunity to operate a modern machine that will enable them to complete their missions successfully. FAB is restructuring and training the squadron to operate Gripen,” says Lieutenant Colonel Renato Leal Leite.

Those who have flown it never forget it. “Flying Gripen was challenging, rewarding and an operational crowning experience,” says Major Gustavo Pascotto.

Teams are working diligently on ...

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The pace at which technology has changed over the last few decades, and continues to do so, has been impressive to say the least. The computers, processors, and electronics of tomorrow are going to be even better and faster. This means any product - no matter how advanced it is - being developed today will have some or a lot of catching up to do every now and then.

For new age fighters, upgradability will be the key. It is for this very reason that Gripen E has been developed with future progress in mind. “The future pilot will need the ability to continuously upgrade the hardware and software and not get stuck in old functionality; this is of increasing importance,” says Saab’s Wing Commander Flying and Gripen test pilot Hans Einerth.

So, how does Saab build a system that is ready for tomorrow, a fighter that will have an edge in an uncertain future?

The answer is 'Split Avionics'. Separating flight critical and mission critical means a less complicated system that allows for easy modifications. Here is how it works at so many levels. 

Gripen avionics system separates 10% of core flight critical management codebase from 90% of tactical management code. This results in avionics that are hardware agnostic, leaving the tactical management to be integrated with new features without the need to re-certify the flight critical software.

Saab’s Avionic Management System (AMS) for Gripen is the first truly open architecture avionics platform. Conscious ...

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The Czech Air Force Gripen have now been upgraded to MS20 which gives the fighter enhanced capabilities, most important of which is the addition of ground strike features.  

As a part of the upgrade, Gripen fighters have been integrated with unguided and laser-guided bombs, enabling Gripen to easily perform air-to ground attacks. Besides, air-to-ground capabilities, new radar modes will also improve the effectiveness of air-to-air attacks. Other additions include that of electro-optical pod Litening III and NATO-standard Link 16 datalink and laser designator pods.

The Czech Air Force signed the lease for 14 Gripen fighters in June 2005. Within a year, the Gripen fighters were delivered. When the decision to extend the lease till 2027 was taken, it was also decided that the fighters will be upgraded to MS20 post 2015.

"Thanks to the modernization of the Czech Gripen aircraft, the operational capabilities of the Czech Air Force will be significantly increased. Our staff has appreciated a close and fruitful cooperation with the Swedish side on this specific modernization project as well as the cooperation during the 13 years that we have operated Gripen aircraft," said Colonel Petr Tománek, Commander of the Czech Air Force’s Caslav Air Base.

Read the full story here. ​

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As the Indian government sets about its journey of acquiring 110 new fighters this month, all eyes are on the various options available for the IAF.

Saab believes its Gripen E fighter to be the ideal solution for the challenges faced by the Indian defence forces. One of the most advanced multi-role fighters in the world, Gripen E has been designed to provide operational dominance and flexibility with superior mission survivability. The fighter offers an enviable 10-minute operational turnaround time, and is compatible with the latest weapons, sensors and mission systems.

Here are five specific reasons why Gripen E is the perfect fighter for India:

Technology Transfer

As per the recently announced RFI, out of the 110 fighter jets required by India, 85% will have to be built in the country under the "Make in India" program.  For Saab, transfer of technology is more than transferring assembly lines to India. From sharing  know-how to transforming their proposed India facility into a regional hub for Gripen, Saab's ToT offer envisions the overall growth of the Indian defence industry. Saab's successful ToT program in Brazil so far further proves that the company is committed to its strategic partnership policy with Gripen operating nations.

Multi-role capabilities

The RFI also mentions the requirement of day-and-night-capable, all-weather, multi-role combat aircraft. Gripen E is the most advanced multi-role fighter that has been designed to meet various demanding operational requirements of air forces today. The fighter can not only seamlessly ...

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With every passing year, the signal environment for Electronic Warfare (EW) systems is becoming more and more complex. There are more signals out there, both military and civilian. Hence it becomes imperative to have a smart EW systems which can quickly differentiate a threat signal from other signals.

All around us, there is an Electromagnetic (EM) spectrum which covers all energy radiated by means of electromagnetic waves including radio communication and radar transmission. According to Inga Bergstrom, Sales Director of Gripen EW, Electronic Warfare is the combat for control of the EM spectrum.

“EW may not be the primary function of a fighter, but it is an enabler to conduct a successful mission,” Inga says.

Some of the tactics used by pilots of fighter aircraft to avoid detection include silent flight by reducing emissions, or by flying at low heights. Even then, detection by enemy devices is a possibility, and in the event that Gripen E’s location has been compromised, EW system provides countermeasure techniques, such as Dispensing – in which decoys are released into the air, creating a false target to fool the enemy.

Elaborating on the features of Gripen’s EW system, Inga says that it is all about listening, detecting, identifying, and if you are detected first, about deterring, defending and defeating. 

EW has been an important part of Gripen from the beginning. Today, Saab has a small, compact system that does a number of things while also reducing drag and ...

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A group of 16 fighter pilots, 4 flight controllers and other personnel from the Brazilian Air Force (FAB) recently undertook a week-long course with Gripen simulators at the Swedish Air Force Combat Simulation Centre (FLSC) in Stockholm, Sweden.

The objective of this course, which included theoretical studies in Brazil, was to familiarize pilots with controls in the Gripen cockpit and understand the fighter system before it arrives in the country. During the week-long course, participants had the opportunity to train in complex scenarios and learn basic combat techniques, tactical datalinks and situational awareness using Gripen simulators.

Each pilot attending the course had flown at least 500 hours in a fighter aircraft. During the course, they went from theory to practice almost immediately and the degree of difficulty in the scenarios increased rapidly, ending in a very complex Beyond-Visual-Range (BVR) combat scenario.

“The pilots are able to fly Gripen in the simulators after only an hour here at the course. The advantages of Gripen is not only in its radars, sensors, weapons and other capabilities, but also the outstanding Human Machine Interface (HMI) that makes Gripen easy for the pilot to use and maneuver. This is something that we can see in the simulators as well,” says Colonel Ricardo Rezende, Leader of the Fox team responsible for the operational issues regarding implementation and developing operational concepts of Gripen in Brazil.

Four out of the 16 pilots who attended the course will be chosen as Gripen pilots ...

Thirty years ago, Gripen took off on its very first flight. The designated test pilot was Stig Holmström. Last year test pilot Marcus Wandt took Gripen E on its first flight. The two pilots met up for a chat.

​Here are some photos and an action-packed b-roll video from the first test flight of the second Gripen E test aircraft. Test pilot Robin's smile and thumbs-up says it all!

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Gripen E development sees Saab, FMV and the Swedish Air Force working together at each stage of development, jointly validating and verifying aircraft systems. As a part of this, test pilot from FMV, Major Henrik Wänseth, flew Gripen E (39-8) for the first time last week. 

“Flying Gripen E was a major target for both FMV and myself. It was both fun and good to verify that what we saw in rigs and simulators matched the aircraft in reality," says Henrik Wänseth, who has been located at Saab for the last two years.

"It will be very exciting to see the tactical systems integrated with this prototype. It will be interesting to see how it grows into a complete combat aircraft system," he adds.

As a part of this testing, functions of the engine, APU, radar, and the Gripen’s overall flight performance were evaluated.

This is the first time when three parties are performing validation and verification together to increase the efficiency of Gripen development. As per Saab, validation confirms whether the correct product has been built. It shows whether the aircraft is operationally viable and capable of the intended functions. Verification confirms whether the product is correctly built – whether the requirements have been met.

"We have several systems that are being integrated and tested at the moment. These include the tactical systems and the new cockpit,” says Karin Brinkebäck project leader, Gripen E Systems Development at Saab.

How does a first flight on a new aircraft feel like? Straight from the pilot’s mouth. Test pilot Robin tells about the first flight with the second Gripen E test aircraft.

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