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Category: TECHNOLOGY

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Last year was a productive one for the Brazilian Gripen Programme, with several important milestones. Among other achievements, we can highlight the first Brazilian aircraft in final production in Linköping and the important results of the joint development of Gripen E and F in Linköping and at the Gripen Design and Development Network (GDDN), in São Paulo State, Brazil.

Since the beginning of the Transfer of Technology Programme in October 2015, more than 120 Brazilian engineers have participated in theoretical and practical ‘on-the-job’ training in Sweden in several technical disciplines related to the development, production and maintenance of the aircraft. These engineers have returned to Brazil and most of them are currently working at the GDDN.

In total, more than 350 Brazilian specialists (engineers, technicians and assembly operators) will be trained in Sweden until the end of the Transfer of Technology Programme, which involves more than 60 offset projects. From now on, the ‘on-the-job training’ in Sweden will be focusing on flight test, verification and production.

Today, 115 Brazilian engineers and 18 expatriates from Sweden work at the GDDN. They are involved in Gripen E/F development work in areas such as vehicle systems, aeronautical engineering, airframe design, systems installation, system integration, avionics, human-machine interface and communications.

"The Gripen programme continues to progress according to schedule, and expectations are high since the first Brazilian aircraft will begin the flight test campaign in Linköping this year," says Mikael Franzén, head of business unit Gripen Brazil and vice ...

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The last ten years of Gripen operations in Thailand have set new standards in South East Asia, says a report in Combataircraft.keypublishing.com.

According to the report, when the Royal Thai Air Force (RTAF) was looking for a new fighter to replace its ageing F-5E Tiger IIs, it was thinking outside the box. Unlike its previous military hardware choices, the air force was looking for a complete package with advanced sensors and network centric capabilities. The contract with Saab was signed in 2008. Deliveries began around 2011 for two single seaters (Gripen C) and four two seaters (Gripen D). They further ordered 6 more around 2010, which were delivered in two phases in 2013.

In the last ten years, Gripen has been a part of various RTAF missions and deployments. Last year, the RTAf Gripen completed 10,000 flight hours at the Pitch Black Exercise.

As per a Jane's report, RTAF is now looking to upgrade its Gripen fighters to MS20 configuration. "We are planning to upgrade the Gripens to the MS20 standard. We have seen the capabilities of the current standard and it would do everything we need," Group Captain Prachya Tippayarat, deputy commander of the RTAF's Wing 7 at Surat Thani Air Base, said.

Read the full story here.

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“As a mechanical engineer, I have taken countless courses about materials, production processes, logistics, industrial economics – and the list goes on. Pretty much everything I have read about at university can be related to the design and production of an aircraft,” writes Johanna from Linköping who talks about her 3-week eye-opening experience working on Gripen fighters at the Saab Aeronautics production unit in Linköping.

Johanna, along with her other graduate colleagues, were part of the Saab Graduate Leadership Programme which is an extended and in-depth introduction to the company for future ‘Saabers.’ Saab's Graduate leadership programme offers thesis work placement wherein students get to solve different kinds of fascinating problems. These students also get to visit Saab sites and develop an extensive understanding of the company.

“What really struck me is how we are taking major steps for the future within production right now. One is how we have successfully implemented full Model-Based Definition (MBD), which is essentially design and production without drawings. Even those who have been working in production for decades, being used to conventional drawings, were happy to show us how they work with their new 3D tools,” she writes.

Read the full story here.

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On 30th January 2019, Saab submitted its proposal for the Finnish HX fighter procurement to the Finnish defence procurement agency. The proposal, which comprises of 64 Gripen aircraft, is a response to the Request For Quotation (RFQ) sent by the Finnish Defence Forces’ Logistics Command on 27th April 2018. The proposal includes both one-seater Gripen E and two-seater Gripen F.

In addition to the Gripen fighters, the proposal also includes a substantial weapon and sensor package and the necessary equipment and services needed for operating the system. This includes an industrial co-operation programme which aims to build extensive national capabilities in Finland for Security of Supply.

The proposal also includes transfer of maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) capabilities to the local industry. Saab has also offered an establishment of a Gripen sustainment and development centre in Finland.

“The outstanding capabilities of Gripen are an excellent match for the Finnish needs and requirements. With Gripen, Finland can renew its fighter fleet without compromising on the number of fighters owing to a truly competitive life-cycle cost,” says Jonas Hjelm, Senior Vice President and head of Saab business area Aeronautics.

The HX Fighter Programme was launched in 2015 and was set up to replace the Finnish Air Force’s current fleet with new fighters.

Read the full story here.

The AESA radar is a huge advancement from earlier mechanical radars which were more prone to “jamming” and other mechanical errors and failures. Emphasizing on the difference in the principle of operation between the two radars, Air Vice Marshal Manmohan Bahadur (Retd.), Additional Director General, Centre for Air Power Studies, says in an interview that one of the biggest advantages of the AESA radar is that it uses an array of TRMs (Transmitter-Receiver Modules) allowing more range and adding more speed.

AESA stands for Active Electronically Scanned Array and means that, in contrast to older generation radars, it has not only one antenna but a full array of small antennas, called elements. This means that the radar can simultaneously and independently track different targets, and also track targets independently of search volumes.

Development of today’s Electronic Warfare (EW), radar, and communications functionality are done keeping air-superiority in mind. What makes Gripen E an air-to-air superior fighter is the integration of the latest generation precision weapons, targeting sensors, and an AESA radar that ensures superiority in situational awareness as well. The AESA radar was integrated to Gripen for the first time during a flight test program in 2009 which was focused on the tactical systems of the multi-role aircraft.

With AESA, Gripen E also features a repositioner which allows the AESA radar to gain another 40 degrees of scanning ability to either side of the aircraft’s nose.

In the words of Major General Ravi ...

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Ever since Saab put together its first Gripen offer to India, it has maintained that the partnership will be on the lines of the "Make in India" concept. Defining its proposal a little more, the Swedish defence and security company has now announced that it will manufacture 96 Gripen E/F fighters in India.  

In April last year, India had issued an RFI according to which 85% of the 110 fighters required have to be built in the country under the "Make in India" program. 

“Except the first 18 aircraft, we intend to manufacture everything in India. Saab will look to build an ecosystem of defense manufacturing inside the country,” said Ola Rignell, Chairman and Managing Director of Saab India.

Saab is no stranger to technology transfer. With its Brazilian gripen programme, Saab has already delivered on about 50% of the technology transfer projects. It is successfully collaborating with Brazilian companies like Embraer and Akaer to co-develop various Gripen E/F parts.   

Saab's Make in India program also includes setting up of a full manufacturing facility and an Aerospace eco-system in India, creation of a local supplier base of ancillary systems, and employment of a well-trained Indian workforce.

Read the full story here.​

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What happens when a multi-role fighter aircraft like Gripen and a state-of-the-art Air-to-Air missile like MBDA’s Meteor come together? They make for one of the strongest and the most lethal combinations in air-warfare. 

During modern warfare, the ability to strike with pinpoint precision from beyond the horizon is very crucial. Let’s take a look at how Meteor, which is considered to be the best Beyond-Visual-Range Air-to-Air Missile (BVRAAM) available today, does exactly that. 

With an operational range of over 100 km, a BVRAAM Meteor missile can travel at a speed of over Mach 4, which is over four times the speed of sound. The missile can accelerate mid-way, leaving very little chances of the target to escape. In fact, it has a no-escape zone of over 60 km which is known to be the largest among air-to-air missiles. 

Meteor is capable of engaging targets ranging from agile jets and UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) to cruise missiles, simultaneously and autonomously in any given weather. 

More features that make Meteor capable include its two-way data link ability, active radar seeker, and the solid-fueled Ramjet motor. The two-way data link allows the pilot to target and re-target the missile even after it has been launched. The active radar seeker enhances the missile’s tracking ability, and the ramjet propulsion system gives Meteor its high-speed performance and the energy to defeat fast, moving targets at long range.

Meteor is an “all-up-around” weapon and is not only lethal, fast, and ...

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It was ten years ago when the Hungarian Air Force Gripen were first sent notification for a quick reaction alert. A Honvedelem.hu​ reports explains in detail how the Hungarian Gripens are used to check airspace violations.

NATO Air Policing ensures the integrity of Allies’ airspace and protects Alliance nations by maintaining 24/7 Air Policing. All airspace protection missions are carried out under the NATO Integrated Air and Missile Defence System (NATINAMDS).  

As far as the coordination during air policing is concerned, NATO’s Combined Air Operations Centres (CAOCs) take care of that: the northern part of Europe is managed from Uedem, Germany, and the southern part from Torrejon, Spain.

Detecting airspace violation

The CAOCs have flight plans for every day and they monitor each and every movement in their assigned skies. When they notice a mysterious plane or a familiar plane deviating from its route or failing to make radio connection, they raise an alarm. 

Pilots with aircraft and missiles are kept at the ready 24*7. So when the Hungarian Air Force units receive an alert, the Gripen fighters are scrambled at the earliest. They approach the target plane and try to make a connection as per the protocols. Once verified, the target plane is escorted to an airbase or the border.

Alpha or Tango?

There are two kinds of alarms in context to airspace violations. When a real threat is detected, the unit on duty has to work on the 'Alpha command'. ...

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Saab is proud to participate in the 12th edition of Aero India in Bengaluru, organized by Indian Ministry of Defence and showcase its world-leading capabilities in air-power, aircraft and surveillance systems, as well as digital air traffic management solutions. And this time, we have quite a few exciting things planned for Gripen E fans in India!

What to expect at the Saab stall at Aero India 2019?

At the Saab stall, there will be a Gripen E simulator that will give a feel of the real Gripen E cockpit, plus there will be a Full Scale Replica (FSR) of Gripen E as well. On display will also be weapon systems that make Gripen the formidable fighter that it is: the MBDA Meteor, the RBS-15 long range ASM and Taurus, the long-range air-to-surface precision cruise missile. Not just that, Saab will also showcase its Gripen Maritime version to share its capabilities and performance.

Win a trip to Sweden, the home of Gripen

Building even more excitement around Aero India 2019, Saab brings the "Gripen Warriors Contest". This contest is a once-in-a-lifetime opportunity for Indian Gripen fans to win a trip to Linkoping, Sweden - the home of Gripen.

The contest is divided in three parts. You need to answer questions on Gripen E at the first two levels, Amateur and Professional. The third and the final level - Ace, will be all about your online gaming skills. You need to submit videos of your flight ...

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The Gripen E-series is for customers who face more pronounced threats or have wider territories to secure. With an ability to constantly evolve, Gripen E is built to keep up with all sort of challenges that a future battle scenario may throw at a pilot. But what exactly helps Gripen deal with the most advanced threats?

Face high-threat environment head-on

Contested airspaces, integrated air defence systems, these are modern battlefield environments that call for the most modern fighter systems. Gripen E/F carries a variety of both active and passive measures to disrupt enemy efforts and protect itself and other friendly units. The new Electronic Warfare (EW) system allows disruption of the enemy’s ability to function effectively. Its goal is to either assist in the destruction of enemy assets or confuse them altogether. Designed to handle the new age signal environment, this EW system, with its  ultra wide band digital receivers, advanced signal processing and extensive processing capacity, can distinguish the real threat signals from others.

Detect First

To succeed in any mission up in the sky, information is the key. But what is even more important is the time at which you get this information. Did your enemy sense you before you sensed them? Gripen E/F reduces its likelihood of being detected by relying on its passive sensors, or through active jamming. It utilizes all available data in the battle cloud, including that sent by other air, land or sea-based units, and fuses it locally ...

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