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The key to operational effect is to get fighters airborne when needed. That’s why Gripen is designed to make sure that availability is maximized at all times. For instance, Gripen can operate from a road strip of only 16 x 800 metres. In this film, you will get more information on what makes Gripen always combat ready.

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The Gripen E-series is for customers who face more pronounced threats or have wider territories to secure. With an ability to constantly evolve, Gripen E is built to keep up with all sort of challenges that a future battle scenario may throw at a pilot. But what exactly helps Gripen deal with the most advanced threats?

Face high-threat environment head-on

Contested airspaces, integrated air defence systems, these are modern battlefield environments that call for the most modern fighter systems. Gripen E/F carries a variety of both active and passive measures to disrupt enemy efforts and protect itself and other friendly units. The new Electronic Warfare (EW) system allows disruption of the enemy’s ability to function effectively. Its goal is to either assist in the destruction of enemy assets or confuse them altogether. Designed to handle the new age signal environment, this EW system, with its  ultra wide band digital receivers, advanced signal processing and extensive processing capacity, can distinguish the real threat signals from others.

Detect First

To succeed in any mission up in the sky, information is the key. But what is even more important is the time at which you get this information. Did your enemy sense you before you sensed them? Gripen E/F reduces its likelihood of being detected by relying on its passive sensors, or through active jamming. It utilizes all available data in the battle cloud, including that sent by other air, land or sea-based units, and fuses it locally ...

​​This year, Gripen E successfully completed the first tests to verify the ability to release and launch external payloads. Watch the video.​

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When Captain Gustavo de Oliveira Pascotto flew Gripen for the first time in 2015, he was very impressed with the way Gripen managed the pilot work load. "What I liked the most was the highly advanced human-machine interface," he said.

Pascotto was one of the first few Brazilian pilots who left Anápolis for F7 in Såtenäs to learn all about the future fighter of their Air Force and pass on this knowledge to his colleagues and newly qualified Gripen instructors.

Fast forward to today, and more than 140 professionals have been trained in Sweden till date. They have already returned to Brazil, and most of them are working at the Gripen Design and Development Network (GDDN).

Today, there is an excitement amongst everyone at the Brazilian Air Force about the arrival of new fighters with people eagerly waiting for Gripen to become operational in Brazil.

“There is a desire and a thrill that has not been seen for a long time. Today we have a group dedicated to studying this aircraft, which asks us a lot of questions. The pilots know they will have the opportunity to operate a modern machine that will enable them to complete their missions successfully. FAB is restructuring and training the squadron to operate Gripen,” says Lieutenant Colonel Renato Leal Leite.

Those who have flown it never forget it. “Flying Gripen was challenging, rewarding and an operational crowning experience,” says Major Gustavo Pascotto.

Teams are working diligently on ...

Thirty years ago, Gripen took off on its very first flight. The designated test pilot was Stig Holmström. Last year test pilot Marcus Wandt took Gripen E on its first flight. The two pilots met up for a chat.

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Saab will intensify its flight trials once it has the two new Gripen E prototypes ready, reports Jane's. The ever evolving aircraft is now set to get two new prototypes, according to Saab’s head of Aeronautics, Jonas Hjelm.

Last year, the first prototype of the Gripen, dubbed 39-8, was revealed. That is soon to be followed up by the 39-9 and 39-10. Both these prototypes have already left the production line at Linkoping, and are currently undergoing verification ahead of their first flights, which is scheduled for 2019.

Jonas Hjelm outlined the necessity for the new prototypes – the 39-9 will be a testbed for the tactical systems, whereas the 39-10 is being designed to be the first production-standard airframe. “The avionics in 39-9 and 39-10 are almost completely different from 39-8, and this shows that our development concept for the aircraft works,” said Hjelm. Incidentally, the 39-7, which was the Gripen demonstrator, is continuing to serve as a test platform throughout the flight trials.

Read full story here.

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Magnus Lewis-Olsson, President at Saab Market Area Europe, chatted at length with Vago Muradian of Defense & Aerospace Report about Gripen E flight tests, weapon integration and technology sharing at the recently held Farnborough International Airshow.

Lewis-Olsson revealed that flight testing for Gripen E is on schedule, and Saab is pushing hard to meet its timelines. Prototype aircraft JAS 39-9 and 39-10 are expected to see the light of day early next year, and with every test the aircraft is getting closer to the operational aircraft. The focus during testing in near future will be on avionics and cockpit.

One of the key elements of the Gripen E is the open architecture of the aircraft – which allows Saab to compartmentalize the flight safety control systems in a bid to increase efficiency. This process is helpful not only because it increases mission safety, but it also extends more control to the users of the aircraft, helping them ‘own’ it as per their requirements. 

Talking about weapon integration, Magnus Lewis-Olsson also outlined the huge impact that the missile Meteor has had on the functionality and prowess of Gripen. The RBS-15 – ‘Gungnir’ was yet another projectile weapon on display, a pioneer of the anti-ship missile contingent. The Gripen on display was loaded to full capacity, with different weapons, to showcase the fighter’s excellent weapons integration capability.

Watch the full interview here​.

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Saab has recently received an order from Sweden’s Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) for modifications of the existing capabilities in the MS20 upgrade to SwAF Gripen fighters. The order that is valued at SEK 224 million concerns with the upgrade of the Gripen C/D system. 

The improvements will be made on the current MS20-configuration that was rolled out in 2016. It was a revolutionary upgrade that made Gripen the world’s first and only combat aircraft to be operational with the MBDA Meteor beyond visual range air-to-air missile system. 

The upgrades for this order specifies improvements to the aircraft’s ‘central capabilities’ which will include target acquisition, self-protection, communication and human-machine interaction, as well as a number of key support and training systems.

The MS20 is fundamentally a software upgrade that consists of a host of features – everything from a weapons system to a communication and maintenance system. The most significant ones, besides Meteor BVRAAM, were the integration of  Boeing GBU-39 Small Diameter Bomb (SDB) and the expansion of Gripen’s ISTAR capabilities. Apart from that, the initial upgrade also included the expansion of NATO-compatible data link system Link 16, a communication upgrade called Digital CAS (Close Air Support) and other major and minor enhancements. 

The work for the current updates will take place at Saab's facilities in Gothenburg, Järfälla, Linköping and Arboga, and will be delivered between 2018 and 2020. 

Read full story here

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Home from home

On the way back from Aero India, Gripen landed at the island of Crete. It was a sought-after stop for the pilots and the snow almost made them feel at home.

Photo: Henrik Paju

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A flare for excellence

With our totally integrated Electronic Warfare system, Gripen is able to penetrate and survive hostile environments. That’s just one reason we call it the smart fighter.

Photo: Ramon Wenink

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