Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content

Gripen

The Smart Fighter

Quick Launch

Gripen > Tags

Tags: Swedish Air Force


Gripen pilot Musa Mbhokota (a.k.a. Midnite), takes us through an extensive walk-through of Gripen E, explaining in detail its features, especially its weapon systems, at Aero India 2019.

Gripen E has a wide weapon carrying capacity- up to nine missiles and 16 bombs can be carried- making it a fighter that is always ready for operating in a network-centric scenario. Partly due to flexible avionics structure, a wide array of weapons- from guided glide bombs for precision engagement with low collateral damage, to long-range and agile air-to-air missiles and heavy anti-ship armaments- can be integrated to Gripen E. 

“What makes Gripen a really powerful fighter system is the Meteor. Meteor is one the best BVRAAMs (Beyond-Visual Range Air-to-Air Missile) available today. With Gripen, Sweden became the first country to integrate the Meteor missile and make it operational on a fighter plane. Meteor has been integrated to Gripen using two way data-link system, which enables you to monitor the mid-course status of missiles,” Musa says. 

Musa then elaborates on weapons like Rafael SPICE (Smart, Precise Impact, Cost-Effective) 250 which is a precision-guided stand-off glide munition, GBU 10 laser-guided bomb, and Tauras 350 long-range missiles.

"Taurus 350 does look like a very large weapon. But we can easily carry it on Gripen. It is an INS and GPs guided missile system. It is used for targets that are difficult to penetrate (dense air-defences on the ground) with small diameter ammunitions," he says.

Besides the weapon ...

Hans Einerth, wing commander flying at Saab, demonstrates Gripen's STOL capabilities in a simulator environment at Aero India 2019.

Gripen is designed to take-off and land on regular roads (800 m long and 16 m wide). This allows for dispersed operations by the operating Air Force, resulting in better combat preparedness. 

Abhay Ashvin, a 24 year-old student pilot from Bengaluru, was crowned the winner of the month-long Gripen Warriors contest that was held by Saab India right before Aero India 2019.

As the grand prize of the contest, Abhay, who is also a DGCA certified Remotely Piloted Aerial Systems (RPAS) examiner, will be visiting Linköping in Sweden, the home of Gripen.

The Gripen Warrior challenge involved an online test of aviation knowledge and flight simulation. The contest had three difficulty stages- Amateur, Professional, and Ace. The contest drew nearly 2,000 participants across 27 states. In the final round of the Ace level, the five finalists got a chance to operate the Gripen Aircraft Cockpit Simulator at Aero India 2019. 

“The aircraft performed exactly as it was told,” says Abhay. “It was my first time on a fighter jet simulator and it was an amazing experience,” he adds. 


Gripen E_EK_2802.jpg
With the launch of the serial production of Gripen E, Saab has made good progress with the fighter programme this year, says Saab Chief Executive Hakan Buskhe.

At an annual results presentation which happened on 15th February, Buskhe said that serial production of the fighter aircraft began in first week of January 2019.

According to the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV), the Gripen E production is very much on schedule, and the first delivery to both Sweden and Brazil should happen by this year end. The goal was to have Gripen operational in Sweden by 2023, but it may happen before that.

During the annual result presentation, Buskhe also talked about Gripen’s current export opportunities. "We just turned in our proposal to Switzerland and Finland, and we are in discussion with Canada," he says.

Read the full story here.

“Gripen is very easy to fly. And that helps the pilot to focus on the mission,” says Swedish Air Force Fighter pilot Henrik Björling, aka "Sunshine" about flying the fighter, at the Finnish Air Force' 100th anniversary celebration.

Much has been said about Gripen’s efficient maneuverability which is, among many, one of the most important reasons why it is considered to be a pilot’s fighter. But what is seldom discussed is the Human Machine Interface (HMI)

Gripen C/D’s cockpit is equipped with three large, full colour, Multi-Function Displays (MFDs) and a wide angle diffractive optics Head-Up Display (HUD) with a holographic combiner providing the pilot with a superior and outstanding situattional awareness.

As said during the training conducted by FAB (Brazilian Air Force) last year by Colonel Ricardo Rezende, the future Gripen pilots were able to effortlessly put theory into practice on the Gripen simulators. During the course of only one week, they had the opportunity to train different complex scenarios in simulators and learn basic combat technics, tactical datalinks, and situational awareness. “It is the outstanding Human Machine Interface (HMI) that makes Gripen easy for the pilot to use and maneuver,” said Colonel Ricardo Rezende.

Meteor_gripen_2501.jpg
What happens when a multi-role fighter aircraft like Gripen and a state-of-the-art Air-to-Air missile like MBDA’s Meteor come together? They make for one of the strongest and the most lethal combinations in air-warfare. 

During modern warfare, the ability to strike with pinpoint precision from beyond the horizon is very crucial. Let’s take a look at how Meteor, which is considered to be the best Beyond-Visual-Range Air-to-Air Missile (BVRAAM) available today, does exactly that. 

With an operational range of over 100 km, a BVRAAM Meteor missile can travel at a speed of over Mach 4, which is over four times the speed of sound. The missile can accelerate mid-way, leaving very little chances of the target to escape. In fact, it has a no-escape zone of over 60 km which is known to be the largest among air-to-air missiles. 

Meteor is capable of engaging targets ranging from agile jets and UAVs (Unmanned Aerial Vehicles) to cruise missiles, simultaneously and autonomously in any given weather. 

More features that make Meteor capable include its two-way data link ability, active radar seeker, and the solid-fueled Ramjet motor. The two-way data link allows the pilot to target and re-target the missile even after it has been launched. The active radar seeker enhances the missile’s tracking ability, and the ramjet propulsion system gives Meteor its high-speed performance and the energy to defeat fast, moving targets at long range.

Meteor is an “all-up-around” weapon and is not only lethal, fast, and ...

GripenE_1601.jpg

The Gripen E-series is for customers who face more pronounced threats or have wider territories to secure. With an ability to constantly evolve, Gripen E is built to keep up with all sort of challenges that a future battle scenario may throw at a pilot. But what exactly helps Gripen deal with the most advanced threats?

Face high-threat environment head-on

Contested airspaces, integrated air defence systems, these are modern battlefield environments that call for the most modern fighter systems. Gripen E/F carries a variety of both active and passive measures to disrupt enemy efforts and protect itself and other friendly units. The new Electronic Warfare (EW) system allows disruption of the enemy’s ability to function effectively. Its goal is to either assist in the destruction of enemy assets or confuse them altogether. Designed to handle the new age signal environment, this EW system, with its  ultra wide band digital receivers, advanced signal processing and extensive processing capacity, can distinguish the real threat signals from others.

Detect First

To succeed in any mission up in the sky, information is the key. But what is even more important is the time at which you get this information. Did your enemy sense you before you sensed them? Gripen E/F reduces its likelihood of being detected by relying on its passive sensors, or through active jamming. It utilizes all available data in the battle cloud, including that sent by other air, land or sea-based units, and fuses it locally ...

Gripen E_09_01_2019.jpg

Towards the end of 2018, Saab received an order from the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV) for new equipment for the development of their Gripen E fighters. This order is a supplement to the older Gripen E contract and is valued at SEK 430 million approximately.

The original contract which was signed with FMV in February 2013 was based on terms that certain parts from their existing Gripen C/D aircraft should be reused. The revised contract requires for new equipment to be made for the development of part of the 60 Swedish Gripen E that have been ordered.

An advantage of this revised contract is the assured availability of Gripen C/D fleet for operational service till the new Gripen E/F aircraft are delivered to the Swedish Air Force (SwAF).

This is the second supplementary contract for a batch of new equipment for SwAF’s future Gripen E aircraft. The first supplementary contract which was signed in December 2017 was also for new equipment for the development of their Gripen E and was valued at approximately SEK 400 million.

Read the full story here.

Gripen E_2611.jpg
On 26 November, Saab completed the successful first flight of the second Gripen E test aircraft.

The second Gripen E test aircraft, designated 39-9, took off on its maiden flight at 09.50 am on 26 November 2018. The test flight was operated from Saab’s airfield at Linköping, Sweden, with Saab test pilot Robin Nordlander at the controls.

“Some people think being a test pilot is the most exciting job in the world and it should be. Flying Gripen E means breaking no sweat though, even on a maiden flight such as this. The flight was so smooth and 39-9 a real pleasure to pilot. I am looking forward to getting it back in the air again and soon putting the new systems to the test,” says Robin Nordlander, Experimental Test Pilot, Saab.

Read the full story here.​

1 - 10 >