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The start-up of production at Saab Aeronáutica Montagens (SAM) plant is fast approaching. In just over a year's time, production will be up and running, where some 60 people, including operators, management, warehouse personnel, and engineers will be manufacturing parts for the Brazilian Gripen E/F fighters. And now, thanks to 3D scanning and CATIA models, it is now possible to tour the plant located outside Sao Paulo by using VR goggles.

Ola Rosén, Assembly Engineer, Saab, and the project manager at SAM, says. ”The aim was to give people an idea of how much space we have allocated for the current work packages. Does the layout allow our operators to move appropriately? Can they move around trollies? We are doing this to ensure that we don’t build the plant and then realise later that it is unsuitable. It will be used as a basis for decision-making before the layout is finalised.” 

Read the full story here.

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Did you know?

South Africa has the second-largest fleet of Gripens, with 26 fighters.

Photo: Justin de Reuck

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With the launch of the serial production of Gripen E, Saab has made good progress with the fighter programme this year, says Saab Chief Executive Hakan Buskhe.

At an annual results presentation which happened on 15th February, Buskhe said that serial production of the fighter aircraft began in first week of January 2019.

According to the Swedish Defence Materiel Administration (FMV), the Gripen E production is very much on schedule, and the first delivery to both Sweden and Brazil should happen by this year end. The goal was to have Gripen operational in Sweden by 2023, but it may happen before that.

During the annual result presentation, Buskhe also talked about Gripen’s current export opportunities. "We just turned in our proposal to Switzerland and Finland, and we are in discussion with Canada," he says.

Read the full story here.

The offer made by Saab for the Make in India programme includes transfer of technology, something which has been proven very effective and beneficial for the Brazilian Air Force (FAB) as well. Besides, acquiring aircraft with multi-role capabilities and superior weapon systems, the technology transfer offer will allow the overall growth of India’s defence industry.

“We’re talking about transferring the knowledge and the skills and the know-how, so that Indian engineers will be able to design, develop, deliver aircraft; and then modify them, maintain them, operate them, sustain them, and keep them cutting-edge for India for the next 50 years. That’s what India needs” says Head of Communications of Saab India, Robert Hewson, during an interview at Aero India 2019. “And only Saab is prepared to transfer that level of independent technology to India,” he adds.

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Saab has taken another important step forward to expand its footprint and aerospace ecosystem in India by signing new Memorandums of Understanding (MoUs) with three of the country’s leading aerospace manufacturers; Dynamatic Technologies Limited, CIM Tools Private Limited and Sansera Engineering Limited.

The MoU with Dynamatic is a starting point to explore future joint opportunities in commercial and defence-related aerostructures work, including Gripen.

“The MoU with Dynamatic adds the capabilities of complex airframe assembly to Saab’s ‘Make in India’ offer for Gripen,”says Mats Palmberg, VP Industrial Partnerships and Head of Gripen for India. 

“Saab’s Aerostructures business unit has had a successful relationship with CIM Tools and Sansera for several years. Based on that experience, we see these two companies can add great value to our Gripen ‘Make in India’ offer,” Mats adds.

The new MoUs announced will enable Saab to work with these Indian companies to establish an indigenous, efficient, tailor-made manufacturing system that will develop, deliver, and support state-of-the-art Gripen fighters in India for the Indian Air Force.

Read the full story here​.

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The Brazilian Gripen will allow the pilot to make accurate decisions in a short time. Want to know more? Watch Episode 18 of our True Collaboration web series!​​​​

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Last year was a productive one for the Brazilian Gripen Programme, with several important milestones. Among other achievements, we can highlight the first Brazilian aircraft in final production in Linköping and the important results of the joint development of Gripen E and F in Linköping and at the Gripen Design and Development Network (GDDN), in São Paulo State, Brazil.

Since the beginning of the Transfer of Technology Programme in October 2015, more than 120 Brazilian engineers have participated in theoretical and practical ‘on-the-job’ training in Sweden in several technical disciplines related to the development, production and maintenance of the aircraft. These engineers have returned to Brazil and most of them are currently working at the GDDN.

In total, more than 350 Brazilian specialists (engineers, technicians and assembly operators) will be trained in Sweden until the end of the Transfer of Technology Programme, which involves more than 60 offset projects. From now on, the ‘on-the-job training’ in Sweden will be focusing on flight test, verification and production.

Today, 115 Brazilian engineers and 18 expatriates from Sweden work at the GDDN. They are involved in Gripen E/F development work in areas such as vehicle systems, aeronautical engineering, airframe design, systems installation, system integration, avionics, human-machine interface and communications.

"The Gripen programme continues to progress according to schedule, and expectations are high since the first Brazilian aircraft will begin the flight test campaign in Linköping this year," says Mikael Franzén, head of business unit Gripen Brazil and vice ...

The goal of a night flying exercise is to develop combat readiness 24*7. The pilots get to train using the night time vision goggles and be better prepared for international missions.​ And of course night time training exercises make for a great video.


“Gripen is very easy to fly. And that helps the pilot to focus on the mission,” says Swedish Air Force Fighter pilot Henrik Björling, aka "Sunshine" about flying the fighter, at the Finnish Air Force' 100th anniversary celebration.

Much has been said about Gripen’s efficient maneuverability which is, among many, one of the most important reasons why it is considered to be a pilot’s fighter. But what is seldom discussed is the Human Machine Interface (HMI)

Gripen C/D’s cockpit is equipped with three large, full colour, Multi-Function Displays (MFDs) and a wide angle diffractive optics Head-Up Display (HUD) with a holographic combiner providing the pilot with a superior and outstanding situattional awareness.

As said during the training conducted by FAB (Brazilian Air Force) last year by Colonel Ricardo Rezende, the future Gripen pilots were able to effortlessly put theory into practice on the Gripen simulators. During the course of only one week, they had the opportunity to train different complex scenarios in simulators and learn basic combat technics, tactical datalinks, and situational awareness. “It is the outstanding Human Machine Interface (HMI) that makes Gripen easy for the pilot to use and maneuver,” said Colonel Ricardo Rezende.

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Royal Thai Air Force welcomed students, parents and teachers to Wing 7 last week to familiarise them with operations at the Air Base.

Image Courtesy: RTAF

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