Skip Ribbon Commands
Skip to main content

Gripen

The Smart Fighter

Quick Launch

Gripen > Tags

Tags: Gripen E/F development

gripen e_meteor1_2911.jpg

With meteor, a Gripen pilot does not need to see the actual target before firing. One of the most lethal radar-guided missiles, Meteor boasts of a two way data-link and an active radar target seeker which ensures that the missile reaches its target, even at very long ranges. Not just that, a two-way datalink also enables the launch aircraft to provide mid-course target updates or retargeting if required, including data from off-board third parties.

“Meteor is the world's most modern radar guided missile. Combined with IRIS-T, we (the Swedish Air Force) now have the world's best air-to-air missiles integrated with the next generation Gripen. Together, these missiles ensure superior air dominance”, says Pierre Ziheri, pilot and director of TU JAS (Tactical Development JAS 39 Gripen). TU JAS is an FMV unit which is fully focused on a single task: to develop the tactical ability within the Gripen fighter system.

Gripen C/D was the first fighter aircraft to have the meteor capability. The test flight was conducted by FMV and Saab in the year 2012. Last month, Gripen E flew for the first time with a Meteor.

According to an FMV report, meteor is a software based weapon system, which means it can be reprogrammed in future if needed. For example, unlike Gripen C/D which has a Rail Lowering system, 

Gripen E has a new eject kit for the missiles which allows it to carry weapons under the aircraft body. Therefore, changes were made to meteor ...

Gripen E has successfully completed the first tests to verify the ability to release and launch external payloads. Watch the video.​

​Gripen test pilots say they have the best job in the world. Watch the video to know why. 


Saab recently announced the launch of RBS15 Gungnir next generation anti-ship missile system at the Farnborough International Airshow 2018.

While Gungnir may look like one of the previous RBS15 versions from the outside, its capabilities are more advanced. More than a mere anti-ship missile, it gives Gripen all-weather capability and operational flexibility like never before.

Gungnir is offered in both air-launched and surface-launched configurations, and has an increased range of more than 300 km. Since it is a flexible launch platform, it can conduct coordinated attacks with multiple missiles against a wide range of naval and land-based targets.

The missile system also promises complete maneuverability without any dependence on GPS or data link. Gungnir is not just made for today's littoral environment, but can also be integrated with pre-existing RBS15 infrastructure to adapt the system for future.

The name Gungnir is from Scandinavian mythology and refers to the Norse god Odin’s spear which never missed its target. RBS15 Gungnir is the system level name whilst in the air-launched configuration the missile is called the RBS15 Mk4 Air.

Gripen E_12_100818.jpg
The pace at which technology has changed over the last few decades, and continues to do so, has been impressive to say the least. The computers, processors, and electronics of tomorrow are going to be even better and faster. This means any product - no matter how advanced it is - being developed today will have some or a lot of catching up to do every now and then.

For new age fighters, upgradability will be the key. It is for this very reason that Gripen E has been developed with future progress in mind. “The future pilot will need the ability to continuously upgrade the hardware and software and not get stuck in old functionality; this is of increasing importance,” says Saab’s Wing Commander Flying and Gripen test pilot Hans Einerth.

So, how does Saab build a system that is ready for tomorrow, a fighter that will have an edge in an uncertain future?

The answer is 'Split Avionics'. Separating flight critical and mission critical means a less complicated system that allows for easy modifications. Here is how it works at so many levels. 

Gripen avionics system separates 10% of core flight critical management codebase from 90% of tactical management code. This results in avionics that are hardware agnostic, leaving the tactical management to be integrated with new features without the need to re-certify the flight critical software.

Saab’s Avionic Management System (AMS) for Gripen is the first truly open architecture avionics platform. Conscious decoupling ...

What does it mean to be a part of the Brazil Gripen fighter programme?  How is the experience of working on the most advanced fighter aircraft like? Hear what people have to say.

< 11 - 16