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The Brazilian Gripen will allow the pilot to make accurate decisions in a short time. Want to know more? Watch Episode 18 of our True Collaboration web series!​​​​

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Last year was a productive one for the Brazilian Gripen Programme, with several important milestones. Among other achievements, we can highlight the first Brazilian aircraft in final production in Linköping and the important results of the joint development of Gripen E and F in Linköping and at the Gripen Design and Development Network (GDDN), in São Paulo State, Brazil.

Since the beginning of the Transfer of Technology Programme in October 2015, more than 120 Brazilian engineers have participated in theoretical and practical ‘on-the-job’ training in Sweden in several technical disciplines related to the development, production and maintenance of the aircraft. These engineers have returned to Brazil and most of them are currently working at the GDDN.

In total, more than 350 Brazilian specialists (engineers, technicians and assembly operators) will be trained in Sweden until the end of the Transfer of Technology Programme, which involves more than 60 offset projects. From now on, the ‘on-the-job training’ in Sweden will be focusing on flight test, verification and production.

Today, 115 Brazilian engineers and 18 expatriates from Sweden work at the GDDN. They are involved in Gripen E/F development work in areas such as vehicle systems, aeronautical engineering, airframe design, systems installation, system integration, avionics, human-machine interface and communications.

"The Gripen programme continues to progress according to schedule, and expectations are high since the first Brazilian aircraft will begin the flight test campaign in Linköping this year," says Mikael Franzén, head of business unit Gripen Brazil and vice ...

The goal of a night flying exercise is to develop combat readiness 24*7. The pilots get to train using the night time vision goggles and be better prepared for international missions.​ And of course night time training exercises make for a great video.


“Gripen is very easy to fly. And that helps the pilot to focus on the mission,” says Swedish Air Force Fighter pilot Henrik Björling, aka "Sunshine" about flying the fighter, at the Finnish Air Force' 100th anniversary celebration.

Much has been said about Gripen’s efficient maneuverability which is, among many, one of the most important reasons why it is considered to be a pilot’s fighter. But what is seldom discussed is the Human Machine Interface (HMI)

Gripen C/D’s cockpit is equipped with three large, full colour, Multi-Function Displays (MFDs) and a wide angle diffractive optics Head-Up Display (HUD) with a holographic combiner providing the pilot with a superior and outstanding situattional awareness.

As said during the training conducted by FAB (Brazilian Air Force) last year by Colonel Ricardo Rezende, the future Gripen pilots were able to effortlessly put theory into practice on the Gripen simulators. During the course of only one week, they had the opportunity to train different complex scenarios in simulators and learn basic combat technics, tactical datalinks, and situational awareness. “It is the outstanding Human Machine Interface (HMI) that makes Gripen easy for the pilot to use and maneuver,” said Colonel Ricardo Rezende.

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Royal Thai Air Force welcomed students, parents and teachers to Wing 7 last week to familiarise them with operations at the Air Base.

Image Courtesy: RTAF

Busy days in the Gripen factory. Another four Gripen E are soon ready to take to the skies!​

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The last ten years of Gripen operations in Thailand have set new standards in South East Asia, says a report in Combataircraft.keypublishing.com.

According to the report, when the Royal Thai Air Force (RTAF) was looking for a new fighter to replace its ageing F-5E Tiger IIs, it was thinking outside the box. Unlike its previous military hardware choices, the air force was looking for a complete package with advanced sensors and network centric capabilities. The contract with Saab was signed in 2008. Deliveries began around 2011 for two single seaters (Gripen C) and four two seaters (Gripen D). They further ordered 6 more around 2010, which were delivered in two phases in 2013.

In the last ten years, Gripen has been a part of various RTAF missions and deployments. Last year, the RTAf Gripen completed 10,000 flight hours at the Pitch Black Exercise.

As per a Jane's report, RTAF is now looking to upgrade its Gripen fighters to MS20 configuration. "We are planning to upgrade the Gripens to the MS20 standard. We have seen the capabilities of the current standard and it would do everything we need," Group Captain Prachya Tippayarat, deputy commander of the RTAF's Wing 7 at Surat Thani Air Base, said.

Read the full story here.

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“As a mechanical engineer, I have taken countless courses about materials, production processes, logistics, industrial economics – and the list goes on. Pretty much everything I have read about at university can be related to the design and production of an aircraft,” writes Johanna from Linköping who talks about her 3-week eye-opening experience working on Gripen fighters at the Saab Aeronautics production unit in Linköping.

Johanna, along with her other graduate colleagues, were part of the Saab Graduate Leadership Programme which is an extended and in-depth introduction to the company for future ‘Saabers.’ Saab's Graduate leadership programme offers thesis work placement wherein students get to solve different kinds of fascinating problems. These students also get to visit Saab sites and develop an extensive understanding of the company.

“What really struck me is how we are taking major steps for the future within production right now. One is how we have successfully implemented full Model-Based Definition (MBD), which is essentially design and production without drawings. Even those who have been working in production for decades, being used to conventional drawings, were happy to show us how they work with their new 3D tools,” she writes.

Read the full story here.

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On 30th January 2019, Saab submitted its proposal for the Finnish HX fighter procurement to the Finnish defence procurement agency. The proposal, which comprises of 64 Gripen aircraft, is a response to the Request For Quotation (RFQ) sent by the Finnish Defence Forces’ Logistics Command on 27th April 2018. The proposal includes both one-seater Gripen E and two-seater Gripen F.

In addition to the Gripen fighters, the proposal also includes a substantial weapon and sensor package and the necessary equipment and services needed for operating the system. This includes an industrial co-operation programme which aims to build extensive national capabilities in Finland for Security of Supply.

The proposal also includes transfer of maintenance, repair and overhaul (MRO) capabilities to the local industry. Saab has also offered an establishment of a Gripen sustainment and development centre in Finland.

“The outstanding capabilities of Gripen are an excellent match for the Finnish needs and requirements. With Gripen, Finland can renew its fighter fleet without compromising on the number of fighters owing to a truly competitive life-cycle cost,” says Jonas Hjelm, Senior Vice President and head of Saab business area Aeronautics.

The HX Fighter Programme was launched in 2015 and was set up to replace the Finnish Air Force’s current fleet with new fighters.

Read the full story here.

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As a response to the Request For Proposal (RFP) issued by armasuisse (the Swiss defence procurement agency), on 6th July 2018, Saab has submitted its proposal for the Swiss New Fighter Aircraft procurement to replace their fighter fleet of F/A-18 Hornet and F-5 E/F Tiger aircraft.

The proposal consists of options for 30 and 40 new build Gripen E fighter aircraft including industrial participation programme for Swiss industry which will be worth 100 percent of the contract value.

 “The proposed Gripen E solution features the latest available technology with low acquisition, operation, and support costs that will give Switzerland an optimal fleet size,” says Jonas Hjelm, head of Saab business area Aeronautics.

The co-operation with Swiss industry that would include manufacturing, maintenance, and technology will improve competence and capabilities aimed at the sustainment and further development of the Gripen E system in Switzerland.

Read the full story here. ​

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