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The Smart Fighter

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​Saab display pilot André  Brännström reveals facts about g-forces and what it's like to perform a flying display. 

​Royal Thai Air Force Gripens flew at the ASEAN International Fleet Review 2017. The ASEAN (Association of Southeast Asian Nations) International Fleet Review, hosted by the Royal Thai Navy, was held in Pattaya City, Thailand last month.

This year, the participating navies celebrated the 50th anniversary of the establishment of ASEAN.


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In an interview with The Hindu Business Line, Jan Widerström, Chairman, Saab India, said that the company is fully committed to Indian government’s ‘Make in India’ plan, and offers full transfer of technology and transformation of their proposed India facility into a regional hub for Gripen.

"We have a blueprint for a comprehensive ‘Make in India’ programme, which will include the setting up of manufacturing and maintenance facilities; transfer of state-of-the-art technology; setting up of an aerospace ecosystem in India; creation of a local supplier base of ancillary systems; and employment of a well-trained Indian workforce, he said.

According to Widerström, Saab is confident that Gripen meets the requirements of the Indian Air Force. It is the fighter of the future, advanced and affordable. With Gripen, the IAF can take on and defeat the challenges of the future.

When asked if the transfer of technology will be difficult to undertake, Widerström says that it is not the case and ensured that Saab will abide completely by the terms of the Strategic Partnership policy of India.

“There is no difficulty. When we talk about full ToT, we are talking about enabling transfer through the value chain, including all our suppliers. In fact, recently, we have started the process of enabling Gripen’s major suppliers, including the American firms, to meet with potential Indian partners. We see the transfer of technology as a seamless process between ourselves and our supplier partners,” he said.​

Read the full ...

​Gripen fighters on flying display at the Dubai Airshow 2017. Two Gripen fighters attended the airshow, with one on static display and the other taking part in the daily flying display, flown by one of Saab’s Gripen pilots.​

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A flare for excellence

With our totally integrated Electronic Warfare system, Gripen is able to penetrate and survive hostile environments. That’s just one reason we call it the smart fighter.

Photo: Ramon Wenink

Gripen is tailormade for short take-off and landings. Here, a Gripen C from the Swedish Air Force, is using an 800 m long and 16 m wide public road as an airstrip during exercise Aurora 17.


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Croatia, which issued Request for Proposals (RFP) for the acquisition of up to 12 modern multirole fighter aircraft in July this year, is close to deciding which fighter aircraft will become part of its Air Force. The choice is ultimately down to the F-16 or the upgraded Gripen C/D, reports DEFENDER.hr.

Responding to the RFP, Saab has offered the new Gripen C/D with the latest MS20 package which is currently operated by the Swedish Air Force. According to Pierre Gauffin, Director Gripen Croatia, Gripen has some clear advantages over its competitors in Croatia. Unlike the other offers, Gripen is not a second hand aircraft which means it will stay relevant for years to come. Also, as compared to F-16, Gripen has been a multi-role fighter from the beginning. It also has a history of successful operation in other countries of the region.

The MS20 upgrade makes Gripen a technologically superior aircraft for many reasons. The upgraded Gripen are integrated with the MBDA Meteor beyond-visual-range air-to-air missile and Boeing GBU-39 Small-Diameter Bomb, improved radar modes and a new laser designation pod (LDP), among other things.

As per the bid, Saab will supply the first two Gripen planes in 2020 just before the anniversary of Operation Storm, the last major battle of the Croatian War of Independence. The company also said that air policing capability will be available in late 2021 and full operational capability will come in 2024.

Read the full story here.

Jonas Hjelm, Senior Vice President, Saab, gives an update about Brazil Gripen programme and transfer of technology.​

Join our display pilot André from the inside the Gripen cockpit as he shows his full display programme. 

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The Czech Gripen fleet has been over a decade in service. The outstanding performance of the system, as demonstrated during NATO exercises and deployments, has increased interest from other Central European countries.

On a sunny afternoon at the Czech Republic’s Čáslav military air base, Captain Jan Ducha stands beside the runway awaiting the return of one of the 14 Saab Gripen that he swears he loves and nurtures like his own children.

 “Beautiful, no?” smiles the commander of Čáslav’s Maintenance Operational Centre, as the Gripen’s grey delta wing and canard silhouette finally materialise against the green of the surrounding countryside. “We’ve had these planes for over a decade now, but watching them come in still gives me pleasure.”

 In June 2004 the Czech and the Swedish government signed a 10-year, leasing agreement for 12 single-seat Gripen C and two twin-seat Gripen D. The first flight took place less than a year later, in April 2005.

 “Apart from the Swedes themselves, the Czech air force was the first to fly the Gripen,” notes Lieutenant Colonel Jaroslav Míka, Commander of Čáslav’s 211 Squadron. “It was we Czechs who proved that the Gripen was fully NATO-compatible.”

Read the full story here.

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